Blog Winter Maintenance Tips for Commercial Buildings

Winter Maintenance Tips for Commercial Buildings

Winter can be a challenging time if you are responsible for the maintenance and upkeep of commercial buildings and facilities. Snow, cold, ice and harsh winds can all cause problems. Therefore, here are a number of things you should do to make sure that your facilities make it through the winter months unscathed and avoid insurance claims.

Here are a few winter maintenance tips for commercial buildings:

  • -Maintain proper heat in all buildings, including those spaces that are vacant or unoccupied.
  • -Temperature must be at a minimum of 65oF/18o. Ensure that your heating systems are regularly inspected and maintained for optimum function. This is essential to avoid one of the most common causes of damage to buildings: frozen and bursting pipes.
  • -Make sure doors and windows are well sealed to keep the cold air out and the warmed air in.
  • -Plow and de-ice parking lots and walkway after extreme cold and/or snowfall. This is to prevent anyone from slipping and falling on your premises.
  • -Clean wet floors and absorbent mats in entryways and walkways. This is to reduce slick floors.
  • -Keep the areas clear by reducing the amount of outside dirt being brought indoors.
  • -Inspect the roofs and gutters. Clear away any excess snow to avoid ice buildup.

Winter Maintenance for Commercial Buildings and Insurance Claims

Following these winter maintenance tips for commercial buildings helps you limit the possibility of damage. Keeping up with basic winter maintenance also helps you avoid any potential liability situations and claims. If you don’t properly maintain your buildings and you do end up with property damage and the cause is poor maintenance, you may have a problem when trying to submit a claim. Insurance is meant to cover sudden and accidental damage, not maintenance.  Planning for a calamity that may never happen can seem tedious. Cleaning up after one that does happen is much worse.

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